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Wednesday, July 24, 2024

“Breaking the Chains: Combating Female Genital Mutilation in Liberia to Empower Girls and Protect Their Rights”

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Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a harmful and deeply rooted traditional practice that continues to affect the lives of many young girls in Liberia.

This practice involves the partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, often without consent or medical supervision. Not only does FGM cause severe physical pain and long-term health complications, but it also denies girls the opportunity to receive an education and build a better future for themselves.

FGM fight suffer setback as many continue to practice FGM amid Ministry of Internal Affairs restriction – It came as a surprise to me as a gender advocate for young girls to continue to face the bruise of harmful practices when the government has issued regulation to put stop FGM activities across the country.

In the morning hours of February 11, 2024 which coincided with the celebration of Liberia Armed Forces Day, I attended a ceremony in Wein Town in Margibi, a mile away from the Roberts International Airport (RIA) where three females were forcefully admitted in the society bush and went through FGM process.

In my role as a gender advocate, I took serious exception to the act and calling on the national government to help those innocent girls that are going through these kind of things across the country.

As it is, no time is more crucial to raise awareness about the harmful effects of FGM and work towards its eradication.

The Boakai’s regime must ensure that girls are given the freedom to pursue their dreams and contribute to the development of their communities. The lip service should stop, we need urgent enforcement because the practice still ongoing secretly In Liberia.

We believe the fight against FGM must be approached with sensitivity and cultural understanding, not business as usual. We will not stop this advocacy despite the threats against our lives; we will keep engaging with local communities, religious leaders, and traditional practitioners to promote dialogue and encourage the abandonment of this harmful practice.

The ultimate objective is to provide access to education and empower young girls.

This can work; we can break the cycle of FGM and create a society where every girl has the opportunity to thrive and reach her full potential.

Together, we can work towards a future where girls in Liberia are protected from the physical and psychological harm caused by FGM and are instead given the chance to shape their destinies.

By Marhlyn B. Marh

Advocate for girls and women rights.

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